10 Great Places for Fall Foliage

Fall Foliage trips are a great addition to a business trip or for a quick weeeknd away or even for a longer family vacation. First 10 reasons why it is great –

  1. Weather has cooled off
  2. Crowds are less (if you pick the destination right) – like Long Island Fall Foliage
  3. Apple Cider
  4. Harvest Festivals – like Pennsylvania Fall Foliage in Amish country
  5. Close to East Coast population centers
  6. Apple Cider
  7. Can be done on a tight budget
  8. Can spend lots of money (e.g. Cruise to see Maine Coast Fall Foliage)
  9. New England Fall Foliage makes the quaint and historic towns even MORE quaint and historic
  10. You can still do all the usual vacation stuff – golf, museums, theme parks, zoos, etc.

And, 10 destinations:

  1. Vermont
  2. New Hampshire
  3. Upstate New York – Fall Foliage Trips, Catskills Fall Foliage , Adirondack Fall Foliage
  4. Central Park, Alley Park, Prospect Park – New York City Fall Foliage
  5. Massachusetts Fall Foliage in the Boston suburbs (e.g. Concord, MA)
  6. DC, Virginia and Maryland Fall Foliage – its not just the Cherry Blossoms that are famous, here
  7. Virginia Fall Foliage is at its best in the Shenandoah, and Blue Ridge Mountains.
  8. Colorado Fall Foliage just a month or two before the skiers arrive. Enjoy the Colorado Rockies Fall colors less than an hour from Denver.
  9. New Mexico Fall Foliage for a different experience
  10. Fall Foliage in the Four Corners region – don’t expect crowds.

And an honorable mention for Pittsburgh for Southwest Pennsylvania Fall Foliage. Who would guess that one!

Summer exhibits at New York City museums

The best part about being a teacher is the vacation time. And since my wife and I both teach, summer vacation is the time to really relax, spend quality time together, travel, and do all the things in New York City that we’re always meaning to do during the year but don’t get around to…mainly, going to museums. Here’s a great list of summer exhibits at some of the best museums in the city:

  • Rococo: The Continuing Curve 1730–2008 at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum (through July 6)
  • Double Album: Daniel Guzman and Steven Shearer at the New Museum of Contemporary Art (through July 6)
  • “A Railroad Reborn: Metro-North at 25” at the NY Transit Museum gallery annex at Grand Central Terminal (extended through July 6)
  • Glossolalia: Languages of Drawing at MoMA (through July 7)
  • ©MURAKAMI at Brooklyn Museum () (through July 13)
  • Sex in Design/Design in Sex at the Museum of Sex (extended through July 13)
  • First Under Heaven: Korean Ceramics from the Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection at the Asia Society and Museum (extended through July 20)
  • Multiplex: Directions in Art, 1970 to Now at MoMA (through July 28 )
  • Projects 87: Sigalit Landau opens at MoMA (through July 28 )
  • “Warhol’s Jews: Ten Portraits Reconsidered” at the Jewish Museum (through Aug. 3)
  • Inspired by Kashmir: Works by New York City Students at the Asia Society (through Aug. 3)
  • Ardeshir Mohassess: Art and Satire in Iran and Vietnam: A Memorial Work by Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba exhibitions at the Asia Society (through Aug. 3)
  • Making It Together exhibition inspired by the ‘70s Feminist Movement at the Bronx Museum of the Arts (through Aug. 4)
  • French Founding Father: Lafayette’s Return to Washington’s America at the New York Historical Society (through Aug. 10)
  • Click! A Crowd Curated Exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum (through Aug. 10)
  • From Another Shore: Recent Icelandic Art, including works from Olga Bergmann, Hildur Bjarnadóttir, Margrét H. Blöndal and Ólafur Elíasson, at The Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America (through Aug. 15)
  • Woven Splendor from Timbuktu to Tibet: Exotic Rugs and Textiles from New York Collectors at the New York Historical Society (through Aug. 17)
  • Orientalism in New York opens at the New York Historical Society (through Aug. 17)
  • Eminent Domain: Contemporary Photography and the City at the NY Public Library (through Aug. 29)
  • Mother Goose in an Air-Ship: McLoughlin Bros. 19th Century Children’s Books from the Liman Collection at the Brooklyn Historical Society (through August)
  • Bedford Stuyvesant: Neighborhood of Change at the Brooklyn Historical Society (through Aug. 31)
  • Philip Guston: Works on Paper at the Morgan Library and Museum (through Aug. 31)
  • Superheroes: Fashion and Fantasy at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Sept. 1)
  • Wiener Werkstatte Jewelry exhibition at the Neue Galerie – Museum for German and Austrian Art (extended through Sept. 1)
  • Framing a Century: Master Photographers, 1840–1940 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Sept. 1)
  • “Radiance from the Rain Forest: Featherwork in Ancient Peru” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art () (through Sept. 1)
  • “Multiple Choice: From Sample to Product” at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum (extended through Sept. 1)
  • “Arbus/Avedon/Model: Selections from the Bank of America LaSalle Collection,” “Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan,” and “Bill Wood’s Business” at the International Center of Photography (through Sept. 7)
  • 183rd Annual Invitational Exhibition of Conemporary Art at the at the National Academy Museum (through Sept. 7)
  • Asa Ames: Occupation Sculpturing at the American Folk Art Museum () (through Sept. 14)
  • Jazz Score at MoMA (through Sept. 15)
  • Dalí: Painting and Film at MoMA (through Sept. 15)
  • Dargerism: Contemporary Artists and Henry Darger at the American Folk Art Museum (through September 21)
  • New York Fast Forward: Neil Denari Builds on the High Line opens at the Museum of the City of New York (through Sept. 21)
  • “Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976″ at the Jewish Museum (through Sept 21)
  • Louise Bourgeois full-career retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum (through September 28 )
  • Red, Black, and Gold at the Rubin Museum of Art (through Oct. 13)
  • NYC Waterfalls in the East River (through Oct. 13)

(thank you newyorkology for a great list!)

(P.S. Check out my post Free NYC (Things to Do and See) for more ideas of ways to spend time (but not money) in New York City this summer.)

Free NYC! (Thing to Do and See)

New York is an expensive place to live, but it doesn’t need to be an expensive place to play! There is so much to do in the city for free, so get a piece of paper and start taking notes (or just hit print):

Always free: The National Museum of the American Indian, the New York Public Library, the Hispanic Society of America, Central Park, Riverbank State Park, Prospect Park, the Socrates Sculpture Park, and Castle Clinton National Monument.

Free on Fridays: The American Folk Art Museum has a lot of character and is free on Friday nights from 5:30-7:30. The Guggenheim (talk about character!) is also free (or rather, pay what you wish) on Fridays starting at 5:45. There’s also music. The Museum of Modern Art is free on Fridays from 4:00-8:00, and the Whitney Museum of American Art opens its doors to the unwilling to pay on Fridays from 6:00-9:00. The American Museum of the Moving Image is also free on Friday evenings, from 4:00-8:00 – a great place to catch up on old You Can’t Do That on Television reruns!

Free on Saturdays: The Studio Museum in Harlem is free on the first Saturday of every month, as is the Brooklyn Museum, but only after 5 p.m. The Jewish Museum of New York City is free every Saturday after 5 p.m.

Other free things to do: Brooklyn Botanic Garden are free on Tuesdays and from 10:00-noon on Saturdays. The New York Botanical Garden (in the Bronx) is free on Wednesdays and also from 10:00-noon on Saturdays.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is free for students (and has a pay what you wish policy for everyone else) and if you save your Met ticket, it can be used as your free pass into the Cloisters Museum.

A lot of this info comes from the National Geographic site (found through Blissful Free Things in NY Travel’s informative post – thanks, Erica!). Thought I’d share the wealth with you all.

You’ll definitely be hearing more from me on this, just in looking these few things up I came across so many other great museums in NYC, less well known ones—that’ll be my next post…so stay tuned!


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